Computing & Economics

Course Content

Year 7-8

In Years 7 & 8, the learners will study the following topics:

• Programming with Scratch
• Programming with Python
• Computer systems
• Computing hardware
• Software
• Representation of data in computer systems
• Databases
• Computer communications and networking

Learners engage with the above topics, all of which are then explored in greater depth at GCSE level. In particular, priority is given to programming in first Scratch and then Python. By the time learners reach Year 9, they will be sufficiently grounded in computing to approach the GCSE Computer Science with confidence, and have enough programming skills to succeed at GCSE Non Examined Assessments.

Year 9-10

GCSE in Computer Science (OCR 9-1)

Learners who take GCSE Computer Science will complete one Non Examined Assessment, which contributes to 20% of their final grade. Here, they undertake a challenging programming project. The remaining 80% of their final grade comes from two Computer Science exams, taken at the end of the course. These paper exams last 1 hour and 15 minutes and test knowledge and understanding of Computer systems, hardware, software, data, databases, communications, security and programming (Component 01) and Computational thinking (Comp 02).

How Learners Are Assessed

Learners are assessed on the quality of their Non Examined Assessment work, which combines programming and written research tasks. The final assessment for the Non Examined Assessment is a written document.

Homework

Homework is essential in supporting the learner’s progress and to determine their understanding of the course. Homework is given in various ways: it might be completing research on a class blog (and providing peer feedback), or on a worksheet (e.g. of exam questions), or on a topic quiz on the school’s VLE, ‘Show My Homework’. Homework is intended to be an extension of study done in the lesson or a preparation for the next lesson, and provides an opportunity to develop independent study skills. It is set at least once weekly in Year 9-10.

Revision, Intervention and Enrichment

At present, learners can participate in a Computing club, run weekly after school. Learners who are assessed to be underachieving at KS3-4 are invited to these after school sessions.

Year 12-13

A Level in Computer Science (OCR)

Learners who take A Level Computer Science build on their knowledge, skills and understanding gained in the GCSE course. They complete one challenging programming project, which contributes to 20% of their final grade. The remaining 80% of their final grade comes from two Computer Science exams, taken at the end of the course. These paper exams last 2 hours and 30 minutes and test knowledge and understanding of Computer systems, hardware, software, data, databases, communications and programming (Component 01) and Computational thinking (Comp 02).

How Learners Are Assessed

Learners are assessed on the quality of their project work, which combines programming and a write-up of the full project life-cycle.

Homework

Homework is essential in supporting the learner’s progress and to determine their understanding of the course. Homework is given in various ways: it might be completing research on a class blog (and providing peer feedback), or on a worksheet (e.g. of exam questions), or on a topic quiz on the school’s VLE, ‘Show My Homework’. Homework is intended to be an extension of study done in the lesson or a preparation for the next lesson, and provides an opportunity to develop independent study skills. It is set at least once weekly in KS4.

Revision, Intervention and Enrichment

At present, learners can participate in a Computing club, run weekly after school. Sixth form learners are encouraged to support Computing clubs in the lower years.